Father Foshee

This morning I attended our “Under Construction Men’s Community Group” meeting. One of the group members had arranged for a Catholic priest to come and talk with us about Catholicism and we had opportunities to ask questions about some of the things we didn’t understand about the Catholic faith, or maybe misconceptions we held. It was a fascinating discussion, and I’m grateful to Father Aaron Foshee for coming to talk to us.

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The Masters

One of my favorite weekends of the year is here, and it’s not just because it’s the beginning to Holy Week. It’s also The Masters golf tournament! I love the tradition, pageantry, and beauty of this tournament every year. Four years ago I had the opportunity to go to Augusta, Georgia with my dad and brother and see one of golf’s most revered courses.

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Palm Sunday

Next Sunday begins the week we call “Holy Week” in the Church. It represents the last week of the life of Jesus before he was crucified and then resurrected on the first Easter Sunday. Holy Week begins with what we call “Palm Sunday”. It gets its name from the story told in Matthew 21 of people cutting branches out of the trees and laying them on the ground before Jesus as he made his triumphal entry into Jerusalem.

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London Attack

On Wednesday, London saw the deadliest terrorist attack they have seen in 12 years. Three people were killed in addition to the man responsible for the act. At times like this I find myself asking lots of questions. How could someone do something like this? What have we done in our world to cause someone to feel the way he must have felt? How can we keep things like this from happening in the future? Will these kinds of terrible acts ever end?

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St. Patrick

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Do you know who St. Patrick was or why we have a day to celebrate in his honor? St. Patrick is credited as being the first bishop of Ireland in the fifth century and the founder of Christianity in Ireland. Legend says that when he was 16 years old, Patrick was […]

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Fasting

During the season of Lent it is a common practice in the Church for people to fast, or give something up. John Wesley was the founder of Methodism and he was a huge proponent of fasting. In fact, he wrote an entire sermon on it – “Sermon XXVII: Upon Our Lord’s Sermon on the Mount”. In this sermon he broke down the biblical reasoning for fasting, the end goals of fasting, and the proper ways to fast.

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Nana

My grandmother was a huge part of my life. My brother and I spent our days with her during the summer while my parents were at work and she helped to raise us and make us into the people we are today. She entered into God’s Kingdom eternal last week after battling dementia for several years, and she will be deeply missed. I look forward to being reunited with her one day.

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Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday seems like such a strange day in the Church for modern people. Why do we rub ashes on our foreheads? Where do these ashes come from? Why do we give something up for Lent? Is this holiday ever mentioned in the Bible? These are all valid questions that we ask every year as we approach the start of the season of Lent.

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Credo

I have been re-reading a book this week called The New Gold Standard. It’s all about the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company and how they have created their legendary culture of hospitality and customer service. As they talked about how they create and maintain that culture it seems that everyone within the company points to one main concept as the primary factor – their “Credo”.

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Under Construction

This morning I met with our “Under Construction: Building Better Dads and Husbands” Community Group. We started a new study today on the five major world religions. One of the members of our group kicked this series off and led us in a discussion about Hinduism. I found it fascinating to see the parallels that could be drawn between Hinduism and Christianity. The commitments that we both have to peace, wisdom, unity, and blessing life was striking. It’s not that I thought Hinduism promoted violence or ignorance, but it was interesting to see just how much we really have in common. I think that’s probably true about many other religions or groups of people if we choose to look at what we have in common rather than what makes us different.

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